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As a kid I searched and searched for a four leaf clover. I never found one. I asked my dad how could I be lucky if I couldn't find one. His reply, "You can make your own luck; it's all around you!."

As a kid I searched and searched for a four leaf clover. I never found one. I asked my dad how could I be lucky if I couldn’t find one. His reply, “You can make your own luck; it’s all around you!

One of my friends recently found her lucky numbers through a reading done by a person who practices YOGIC Numerology.  This is a described technology which helps us better understand ourselves and the experiences in our life through numbers.  I asked her what she thought of the reading and she said it was very true.

It made me think, what type of luck do I believe in?Do I have a lucky charm or a pet rock? Salespeople often talk about their ‘lucky shirts.’

Why do we believe in luck and what does it really mean to our success?

Here’s my take on feeling lucky; I know I’m lucky. I equate ‘luck with opportunities,’ and I see them all around me. It’s when I stop looking that my luck disappears. People always say to me, “You have the most interesting things happen to you. I know they don’t just happen, I am forever ‘looking.

 

There are several different types of luck, according to Psychology Today. How we feel about luck can drive the

outcome of our lives. Should you believe in luck? According to what I read I think we should. I am a firm believer  in

luck and making my own. It’s said that believing in luck can drive your motivation forward.

 

According to Business Psychologist, Cragin Dowden, “Believing in luck appears to impact people’s drive for success. People who saw their luck as stable tended to have a significantly higher drive to succeed than those who viewed it as transitory. The research also found that part of the relationship between luck and achievement was attributable to the fact that people who possessed stable luck beliefs also felt they had more control. This makes sense: If you feel luck is stable, and within your sphere of influence, you are much more likely to persevere towards our goals. However, if you see luck as an essentially random phenomenon, you may wonder, “What’s the point?” This skepticism can effectively undermine your desire to push on.
Former Wall Street Journal and Fortune writer Erik Calonius points to a fascinating study by a psychologist Richard Wiseman. Wiseman surveyed a bunch of people to find out who considered themselves lucky or unlucky, then performed a very interesting test:

Weisman  gave both the “lucky” and the “unlucky” people a newspaper and asked them to look through it and tell him how many photographs were inside. He found that on average the unlucky people took two minutes to count all the photographs, whereas the lucky ones determined the number in a few seconds.

How could the “lucky” people do this? “Because they found a message on the second page that read, “Stop counting. There are 43 photographs in this newspaper.” So why didn’t the unlucky people see it? Because they were so intent on counting all the photographs that they missed the message.”

So what does this mean?

Could it be that lucky people are more relaxed and open, and see always see opportunities around them? In my recent article for the Albany Times Union, “Is your New Success Around the Corner?” I sited a recent conversation I had with a store owner who’s business was forced to relocate. Moving actually doubled his business. My research shows me that people who are open for new ideas are always looking for possibilities.

It appears that it doesn’t matter what you believe in you just need to believe. Particularly if you want something new to  happen in your life.When we put on ‘blinders’ we don’t see what’s available round us.

Do you need some ‘luck?” Contact Lisbeth who will help you look for the opportunities surrounding your life.

 

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